Campus Life

For the duration of students' studies, The Culinary Institute of America is the focal point of their life. That's why we offer many opportunities to make the stay with us as fulfilling and enjoyable as possible. We encourage students to positively contribute to extracurricular life on campus. This section details campus life and the various services available.

Student Affairs Division and Staff

The staff of Student Affairs is available as resources for issues, concerns, or problems that may arise as students progress through their college experience. The staff is prepared to assist in solving problems directly or in making appropriate referrals. Issues affecting the quality of student life, discipline, personal safety, alcohol/drug awareness, and student interactions are examples of reasons to visit our student affairs staff. We are committed to helping all students be successful, so feel free to come in and see us if any issue arises. The following offices and staff will assist students with student affairs needs at each campus

New York

Student Affairs Office, Student Commons, Room 236

Residence Life Office, Student Commons, Room 221

Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS), Student Commons, Room 218

Student Health Services, Roth Hall, lower level

Student Activities, Recreation, and Athletics, Student Commons, Room 014 (Located behind Front Desk)

International Student Affairs, Student Commons, Room 200

California

Student Affairs Assistant

Residence Life and Housing Coordinator

Assistant Dean—Student Affairs

Student Life Coordinator

Texas

Student Services Manager

Associate Dean—Degree Programs

Singapore

Managing Director 

Management Support Officer

Student Affairs Mission

Student Affairs is dedicated to encouraging individual growth and development both in and out of the classroom. We strive to provide a holistic educational experience so students can become more self-actualized, leading to balance, ethical conduct, and responsible citizenry. Five cornerstones direct our philosophy:

  1. Foster student wellness, health, and safety
  2. Cultivate an empowered, diverse, engaged campus community
  3. Advance co-curricular student learning
  4. Support student retention and success
  5. Create an outstanding student experience

Wellness Philosophy

The Student Affairs Division endorses an important wellness philosophy to CIA students. This wellness model is used on many college campuses and is the framework for a healthy lifestyle that includes the balance of physical, intellectual, emotional, social, occupational, and spiritual well-being. We hope students will learn the framework of such a lifestyle and begin their wellness journey while at the CIA. We also hope these concepts will stay with students throughout their lives.

Student Affairs Office

The Student Affairs Office is comprised of staff members who act as resources for issues, concerns, problems, or dilemmas that may arise as students progress through their college experience. As a clearinghouse, the staff is prepared to assist in solving problems directly or in making appropriate referrals. Issues affecting the quality of student life, discipline, personal safety, alcohol/drug awareness, and student interactions are examples of reasons to visit the Student Affairs Office staff. We are committed to helping all students be successful, so feel free to come in and see us if there is anything to discuss.

The following staff make up the Student Affairs Office:

New York

Associate Vice President—Dean of Student Affairs

Associate Dean—Student Affairs and Residence Life

Associate Dean—Campus Life and Student Development

Assistant Dean—Student Conduct

Executive Assistant

California

Assistant Dean—Student Affairs

Texas

Managing Director

Student Services Manager

Group Leaders

Group leaders are among the most important pieces of the education system at the CIA. Elected during freshman year and then once again after externship, group leaders act as "coaches of their teams." They are the liaisons between their group mates and the faculty. They meet often with instructors, hold group meetings, administer surveys and evaluations, relay mail messages, and represent the group on campus.

The benefits of leading a group are substantial. There is the value of the leadership experience, the chance to master managerial skills, and a feeling of personal satisfaction and pride from successfully steering groups through the curriculum. There is great worth in exchanging ideas, experiences, and information with the most visible student leaders at the college. This position will also help strengthen relationships with the faculty and staff. Additionally, student worth as a culinary professional is greatly enhanced by acting as a group leader. The leadership and managerial skills students will gain from being a group leader are exactly what prospective employers are looking for in dedicated and capable employees.

Students should expect their group leader to be a motivator, facilitator, organizer, troubleshooter, and, most of all, good communicator.

Group leaders may be expected to attend a monthly meeting with key staff to bring forward student issues for discussion and resolution, as well as learn about important campus news.