Federal Financial Aid Programs

The CIA participates in the following programs, which are funded wholly or in part by the U.S. government. More information about these programs can be found at studentaid.ed.gov or on FATV.

Federal Pell Grant

Pell Grants are awarded to eligible students enrolled in a degree or certificate program who have not yet earned a bachelor's degree and have not exhausted their maximum lifetime eligibility, which is the equivalent of six school years. Award amounts are determined by the U.S. Department of Education based upon the student's expected family contribution (EFC). Learn more about Federal Pell Grants.

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)

Students who are eligible for a Federal Pell Grant may be considered for a Federal SEOG. Based on the availability of funds, priority is given to students with the greatest need who submitted the FAFSA by the CIA's deadline. Amounts vary and are determined each year based on funds allocated to the CIA by the U.S. Department of Education. Learn more about FSEOG.

Federal Work-Study

Students may apply for a Federal Work-Study position if Student Financial and Registration Services determine they are eligible. The dollar amount of the award is only an estimate of the student's expected earnings and is not deducted from the student's billing statement. Work-Study-approved students find employment by applying for one of the on-campus jobs at the CIA. Jobs are posted daily on CIA Main Menu. Students may work up to 20 hours per week. Preference for on-campus employment is given to Work-Study-approved CIA students; however, jobs are not guaranteed. Watch this video to learn more about Federal Work-Study.

Federal Direct Student Loans (Subsidized and Unsubsidized)*

Both Direct Student Loan programs require the borrowers to complete entrance counseling and the Master Promissory Note. To obtain more information about the Federal Direct Student Loan programs, including the current interest and fee rates, students should visit https://studentaid.gov.

The Federal Direct Subsidized Student Loan is awarded to students who demonstrate financial need. The federal government pays all interest costs for Direct Subsidized borrowers while the borrowers are in school. Important to Know: Students who are first-time borrowers can only borrow through a Direct Subsidized Student Loan for a time period equivalent to a maximum of 150% of the published length of the program in which they are enrolled. Under certain conditions, the provision also causes first-time borrowers who have exceeded the 150 percent limit to lose the interest subsidy on their Direct Subsidized Student Loans. For more information, go to studentaid.ed.gov or watch this video on the "150% loan limit rule."

The Direct Unsubsidized Loan is awarded to students who do not demonstrate financial need or who need to supplement their Direct Subsidized Loan. Borrowers remain responsible for all interest that accrues (accumulates) during school, grace, and deferment periods.

Dependent students in their freshman year of the degree programs can borrow up to $5,500 (including up to $3,500 Subsidized) per year. Sophomores can borrow up to $6,500 (including $4,500 Subsidized) per year. Juniors, seniors, and students in the undergraduate certificate program can borrow up to $7,500 (including $5,500 Subsidized) per year. Students in the graduate certificate program may borrow up to $20,500 in an Unsubsidized Loan only. Important to know: Dependent undergraduate students whose parents are unable to borrow a Federal Direct PLUS due to adverse credit can receive an additional $4,000 in Unsubsidized Loan funds.

Independent students (typically 24 years old or older) in their freshman year of the degree programs can borrow up to $9,500 (including up to $3,500 Subsidized) per year. Sophomores can borrow up to $10,500 (including up to $4,500 Subsidized). Juniors, seniors, and students in the undergraduate certificate program can borrow up to $12,500 (including $5,500 Subsidized) per year. Students in the graduate certificate program may borrow up to $20,500 in an Unsubsidized Loan only.

Students start repayment of the Direct Loan six months after they complete their program, withdraw, or otherwise stop attending the CIA. The government offers different repayment plans, including an Income-Based Repayment (IBR) option. To review repayment options, visit https://studentaid.gov. For your reference, please see the Federal Loan Repayment Chart; this chart is based on the standard repayment plan, which spreads the principal and interest out over 10 years. All loans taken out to finance a student's education must be paid in full and in a timely manner. Failure to repay loan(s) will affect the student's credit rating and ability to use federal funding in the future. Upon graduation or otherwise exiting the CIA, student borrowers will be given information on loan repayment terms and conditions.

If a student obtains a loan to pay for an educational program, the student will have the responsibility to repay the full amount of the loan plus interest, less the amount of any refund.
If the student has received federal student financial aid funds, the student is entitled to a refund of the moneys not paid from federal student financial aid program funds. See the "Credit Balances" section for more information.

Learn more about Federal Direct Loans in this video.

Federal Parent PLUS Loan*

Federal Parent PLUS Loans are loans for parents of dependent undergraduate students (Parent PLUS) or students in a graduate program (Graduate PLUS).

Parents of dependent undergraduate students may apply for a Parent PLUS Loan to help with their child's educational expenses. The parent must be the student's biological or adoptive parent or custodial stepparent and must not have an adverse credit history. In addition, the parent must complete the Parent PLUS application and sign the Master Promissory Note (MPN). Important to know: Parents can apply for a Parent PLUS Loan up to 120 days prior to the student's entry date. The amount that may be borrowed is limited to the student's cost of attendance (as determined by the CIA), minus financial aid from all other sources. To obtain more information about the Federal Parent PLUS program, including the current interest and fee rates, students and parents should visit www.studentloans.gov.

Students in a graduate certificate program may apply for a Graduate PLUS Loan to help with their educational expenses. The student borrower must not have an adverse credit history. In addition, the student must complete the Graduate PLUS application and entrance counseling and sign the Master Promissory Note (MPN). Important to know: Students can apply for a PLUS up to 120 days prior to the student's entry date. The amount that may be borrowed is limited to the student's cost of attendance (as determined by the CIA), minus financial aid from all other sources. To obtain more information about the Graduate PLUS program, including the current interest and fee rates, students should visit www.studentloans.gov.

The government offers different repayment plans for the Federal PLUS Loans, including an income-based repayment (IBR) option. To review repayment options, visit www.studentloans.gov. For their reference, students should view the sample repayment chart; this chart is based on the standard repayment plan, which spreads the principal and interest out over 10 years. All loans taken out to finance a student's education must be paid in full and in a timely manner. Failure to repay loan(s) will affect the borrower's credit rating and ability to use federal funding in the future. Find out more about the Federal Parent PLUS here.

* If a student has a Federal Direct Student Loan, and/or Federal Parent PLUS Loan, the loan information will be submitted to the National Student Loan Data System (NSLDS), and will be accessible by guaranty agencies, lenders, and institutions determined to be authorized users of the data system. For more information, please visit https://nslds.ed.gov/npas/index.htm.