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    The Culinary Institute of America
   
 
  Aug 20, 2017
 
 
    
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2017-2018 Academic Catalog

Academic Rules, Regulations, and Information



Students at The Culinary Institute of America, as at any college, are taught a variety of information, skills, and values in their classes. They are evaluated based on their performance in the college’s classrooms, kitchens, bakeshops, and dining rooms as they progress toward their degree or certificate. This section outlines the information and regulations that support the curricula and academic life at the CIA.

Registration

Registration is the formal process of enrolling in the college’s degree or certificate programs. Students must be cleared academically and financially to progress from one semester to the next. Students can only attend classes if they are registered. Registration schedules are posted on CIA Main Menu. For more information, contact Student Financial and Registration Services.

When students receive academic and financial clearance, they will be assigned an associate degree or certificate program class schedule at the discretion of the CIA. The college reserves the right to alter groups, schedules, policies, and operational procedures in order to achieve the best educational balance. For the bachelor’s degree schedule at the New York campus, students will choose their courses following a set of guidelines. At the CIA Singapore, courses for the bachelor’s degree will be offered based on the academic needs of each entering cohort of students to meet the degree requirements of the CIA.

Course Load

Full-time students are scheduled for 12 to 18 credits in a 15-week semester. Occasionally, a student may request a credit overload to 21 credits in a specific semester. Due to the academic rigor required, an overload request will be granted provided the student has attained a cumulative GPA of 3.60 or higher after having completed at least 30 credits at the CIA and has permission from his or her academic advisor. A student on overload will pay the per-credit charges for credits above 18. Please see Tuition and Fees . Under no circumstances will a student be permitted to take more than 21 credits in a semester.

Students placed on academic probation are limited to a maximum of 15 credits per semester. For more information, see Academic Progress.

Prerequisites

Because of the unique nature of the curriculum, there are occasionally courses that must be passed before students will be permitted to take the next course in the sequence. These prerequisites are set by the Education Division’s Curriculum Committee and are enforced by the Registrar’s Office. If there are any questions, students should contact the Center for Career and Academic Advising for further clarification.

Comprehensive Examinations

Required for associate degree and certificate program graduation, the exams—known as practical exams—are subject to the same academic regulations as all courses. Students can get more information about the comprehensive examinations from Student Financial and Registration Services.

There are two comprehensive examinations built into each associate degree program; two cooking practical exams for the culinary arts programs and two baking and pastry practical exams for the baking and pastry arts degree programs. In the ACAP, there is one comprehensive exam in cooking. In the bachelor’s degree program at the CIA Singapore, the cooking practicals will be administered in the first semester of the junior year and the second semester of the senior year.

All of these exams are mandatory. Neglecting to take these when they are scheduled will result in a makeup fee of $150 for each missed exam.

Class Admittance

For a student to be admitted to class, the student’s name must appear on a class roster.

Students also must have financial clearance to attend classes at all times. In order to start the first course of a semester, a student must possess a valid, signed class admit card from Student Financial and Registration Services.

Course Makeups

Students who have to make up a course for any reason must make arrangements to re-register for the course. Doubling up on courses is strongly discouraged, but may be permitted under the following conditions:

  • The courses being considered are not both laboratory courses—cooking, baking, pastry, or table service.
  • The student has a minimum grade point average of 2.0 and is not on academic probation.
  • The enrollment in the makeup course does not exceed the maximum allowable class size.
  • The course schedules do not conflict.
  • There are no non-laboratory prerequisites.

Students who fail a course twice must obtain written permission from the academic dean (NY), director of education (CA), director of education (TX), or managing director (SG) to take the course at another college and must receive a grade of “C” or higher to transfer the credits back to The Culinary Institute of America.

ServSafe Exam Retake

The ServSafe® Certification Examination is given as the final exam in the CIA Food Safety (AOS) and Introduction to Food Science (AAS) courses. Consisting of 80 multiple-choice questions, the exam is recognized by 95% of jurisdictions that require or encourage food safety certification. The certifying body is the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation which provides a number of different versions of the secured exam.

Exams in Spanish, Korean, Japanese, Chinese, and French Canadian are available, but requests must be made by the end of the first full week of the student’s Food Safety or Introduction to Food Science class in order to make the accommodations.

Only exams proctored at The Culinary Institute of America will be accepted, and a certification exam score of 75% or better is required to pass the exam and become certified. Students who score below 75% will be given an Incomplete (I) for the Food Safety or Introduction to Food Science course and are required to retake the exam within six weeks. To be eligible to retake the exam, the student must have an average of at least 65% in the Food Safety or Introduction to Food Science course.

Students must complete five hours of tutoring no more than 30 days before the scheduled exam date in the Learning Strategies Center/Library Learning Commons (U.S. campuses) or a faculty member (SG) prior to retaking the exam. Students will not be permitted to retake the exam without proof of the tutoring hours.

Students who fail the exam a second time will have their Incomplete (I) changed to a Failure (F) and they will have to retake the entire Food Safety or Introduction to Food Science course. This is likely to result in a delay in leaving for externship.

No more than four attempts to pass the exam are allowed in a year, and a 60-day waiting period is required between the second and third attempt (the 60 days includes the retaking of the course) and again between the third and fourth attempt. After the fourth attempt, the examinee must wait another full year before he or she is eligible to retake the exam a fifth time.

Students will be charged $60 for exam retakes.

Culinary and Baking & Pastry Practical Retake

Students in the degree programs who remain unsuccessful at passing either the culinary or baking and pastry practical examinations after their third attempt will not be allowed to register for a subsequent attempt until they have met with the dean of academic engagement and administration (NY culinary arts students), dean of baking and pastry arts (NY baking and pastry arts students), director of education (CA and TX students), or managing director (SG students). The student may be required to repeat appropriate coursework and/or complete remedial work before being allowed to register for any subsequent attempt.

If a student does not pass on his or her fourth attempt, the student will be required to meet with the Academic Standards Committee, which may or may not require the student to take a leave of absence in order to gain additional culinary or baking and pastry skills.

Culinary Practical Retake—ACAP

Students in the ACAP who remain unsuccessful at passing the culinary practical examination after their third attempt will not be allowed to register for a subsequent attempt until they have met with the Standards Committee. The Committee may require the completion of remedial work before allowing the student to register for any subsequent attempts. This may require the student to withdraw in order to complete the work off campus. Students will be notified by the student affairs manager when they are required to meet with the Standards Committee.

Withdrawal from a Course

Students are expected to attend and complete all classes for which they are registered. Students are eligible to participate in an add/drop period during the first seven calendar days of each semester (attendance policies apply during the add/drop period). There is no add/drop period during a student’s externship semester. Students who decide to withdraw from a course after the add/drop period must request their withdrawal with the Center for Career and Academic Advising. Students will be eligible for a grade of “W” if withdrawing from the course by the deadline listed in the chart below. After that time, the student will be assigned a grade of “WF.”

Course Withdrawal Timeline

Length of class Typical meeting days Last day to withdraw
with a grade of “W”
3-week lab or lecture course 5 days per week 3rd class day
5-week lab course 5 days per week 5th class day
6-week lecture course 2 days per week 6th class day
7-week lecture course 2 days per week 7th class day
9-week lecture course 4 days per week 9th class day
12-week lab or lecture course 1 day per week 6th class day
12-week lab or lecture course 2 days per week 12th class day
15-week lab or lecture course 1 day per week 7th class day
15-week lab course 2 days per week 6th class day
15-week lab or lecture course 2 days per week 15th class day

Repeating a Course

Students will be permitted to repeat classes they have previously failed or from which they have been withdrawn. Students will also be permitted to repeat a course they have failed twice. If the student successfully completes the course, the passing grade will be issued. The previous failure or failures remain on the student’s transcript, but are not included in the calculation of his or her grade point average. If the repeated course is failed more than two times, the student must meet with his or her academic advisor or the director of the Center for Career and Academic Advising for permission to repeat the course a third time.

Students will be permitted to repeat classes for which they have previously earned a grade of “D” once. The previous “D” grade remains on the student’s transcript, but is not included in the calculation of his or her grade point average. The higher grade will be calculated in the student’s grade point average. Students repeating courses must consult with Student Financial and Registration Services to prevent scheduling conflicts and to review potential financial aid implications. Please review GPA and completion rate information under Satisfactory Academic Progress .

Independent Study

Independent studies provide a unique opportunity for highly motivated students in the bachelor’s degree programs to pursue a particular area of study under the guidance of a faculty member. The protocol for students who wish to create an independent study is as follows:

  • Identify a research project and a faculty member with the appropriate expertise who is available to work with them.
  • Write a formal proposal for their independent study that includes the following parts: description and rationale for the research project, three to five sources, and a timeline.
  • The proposal needs to be approved by the faculty member and an associate dean no later than the first week of the semester in which the independent study will be done.
  • The associate dean will give the final approval and notify the Registrar’s Office.

Another option for students interested in pursuing an independent study is to enroll in the Honors Thesis Seminar (BPSE-415) .

Bachelor’s Degree Concentrations

Students in the food business management major of the bachelor’s degree program have the option of participating in a specialized program of study that may include a semester at one of the college’s branch campuses:

  • Advanced Concepts in Baking and Pastry (semester in California; for students who have completed the baking and pastry arts core only)
  • Advanced Wine, Beverage, and Hospitality (semester in California)
  • Asian Cuisine: An Edible Journey from Traditional to Contemporary (semester in Singapore)
  • Farm-to-Table: Practices of a Sustainable Table (semester in California)
  • Intrapreneurship: Driving Innovation from Within an Organization (fully in New York)
  • Italian Cuisine: An Edible Journey from Traditional to Contemporary (semester in Italy)
  • Latin Cuisine Studies: New World Flavors, Ingredients, and Techniques (semester in Texas)

In addition, students in the applied food studies major of the bachelor’s degree program have the option of taking the following concentrations:

  • Advanced Wine, Beverage, and Hospitality (semester in California)
  • Asian Cuisine: An Edible Journey from Traditional to Contemporary (semester in Singapore)
  • Farm-to-Table: Practices of a Sustainable Table (semester in California)
  • Italian Cuisine: An Edible Journey from Traditional to Contemporary (semester in Italy)
  • Latin Cuisine Studies: New World Flavors, Ingredients, and Techniques (semester in Texas)

Each semester is approximately 12 to 15 weeks and space is limited. In order to be considered, students must submit a Request to Participate form to the Center for Career and Academic Advising.

Students interested in pursuing a concentration must meet the following requirements:

  • Be in good academic standing as defined in the CIA Academic Catalog,
  • Have successfully completed Financial Accounting (Financial Accounting (MGMT-310) ), and
  • Have no more than two other “first-term” (first semester, junior year) courses not yet successfully completed in the bachelor’s program.

Students may be permitted to register for a concentration in the second semester of the senior year under the following conditions:

  • The concentration is not offered during the first semester of their senior year,
  • They have fulfilled the language requirements, and
  • They have successfully completed Foodservice Management (Foodservice Management (MGMT-450) ) prior to leaving for that concentration (for concentrations with a semester at one of the CIA’s branch campuses).

Concentrations running every semester (starting September, January, and May)

  • Advanced Concepts in Baking and Pastry
  • Advanced Wine, Beverage, and Hospitality
  • Intrapreneurship: Driving Innovation from Within an Organization

Concentration running two semesters each year

  • Asian Cuisine: An Edible Journey from Traditional to Contemporary (starting January and September)
  • Italian Cuisine: An Edible Journey from Traditional to Contemporary (starting January and September)
  • Latin Cuisine Studies: New World Flavors, Ingredients, and Techniques (starting January and May)

Concentration running one semester each year (starting May)

  • Farm-to-Table: Practices of a Sustainable Table

Double Majors and Concentrations

Occasionally a student wishes to specialize in two discrete areas of study to prepare for his or her intended career. In such a case, the student may want to apply for a double major or double concentration. The student will complete a single set of core requirements and complete two sets of major and major elective/concentration requirements, one for each major desired. Courses cannot be counted twice to meet different requirements. Students who complete the requirements for a double major receive a single diploma.

Requirements:

  • Students who request a double major or double concentration must do so by the second semester of the junior year so as not to extend the length of the current degree program.
  • The option of earning a double major or concentration is available to matriculated baccalaureate students only and based on availability.
  • A double major/concentration requires the approval of the Center for Career and Academic Advising, which will take into consideration issues such as potential scheduling conflicts and transfer credits prior to approving the program of study.
  • The student must select one major as his or her primary program of study.
  • If a student wishes to declare a concentration within one of the majors, that too must be approved by the Center for Career and Academic Advising.
  • If the courses for the first concentration also fulfill elective requirements for the degree and/or the major, courses toward a second concentration are in excess of the totoal required for the degree. Therefore, these courses cannot be considered toward the student’s full-time enrollment status and are not eligible for financial aid.

If a student expresses a second area of study interest that will extend the duration of study beyond the normal program length, the request may be granted with the following stipulations:

  • The current degree (pending successful completion) will be conferred as planned.
  • The student may re-enroll as a non-matriculated student.
    • There is no financial aid eligibility for the non-matriculated status.
    • The student will be reported to any lenders as graduated from his or her degree program and begin repayment of any loans incurred.
    • The courses required for the additional major or concentration will appear on the student’s official transcript with earned grades.
    • The transcript will not note an additional major or concentration since the student is not enrolled in a degree program.

No amended or additional diploma will be issued at the conclusion of the course work.

Auditing Courses

In order to enable students to pursue topics of their interest and take courses that are not included in their degree or certificate program, students may audit degree or certificate courses under the following conditions:

  • The student must be enrolled in a degree or certificate program,
  • The course is not a required course in the student’s degree or certificate program,
  • There is room in the course,
  • There are no scheduling conflicts,
  • The course is normally offered by the college for credit,
  • The faculty member has approved the request to audit the course, and
  • The student has paid the audit fee before the class begins.

The Externship and Global Cuisines and Cultures courses are not eligible for audit. The auditing fee for any course shall be $490 per credit.

Students who audit degree or certificate program courses are expected to attend all classes, but their work will not be evaluated and no record of their participation will be kept. Their transcripts will show that they have audited the course.

Students who want to audit courses must make payment and scheduling arrangements with Student Financial and Registration Services (NY), the registration manager (CA), the director of education (TX), or the managing director (SG).

Technical Standards

The mission of The Culinary Institute of America is to teach students the general knowledge and specific skills necessary to grow into professional positions of influence and leadership in the food and hospitality industry. Contemporary culinary, baking and pastry, and hospitality education requires that the acquisition and utilization of professional knowledge be accompanied by a necessary set of skills and professional attitudes. The CIA requires that all students meet certain functions and technical standards that are essential for successful completion of all phases of our education programs, and that reflect industry requirements and standards.

To participate in and successfully complete the CIA’s degree, certificate, and/or non-credit programs, each student, with or without reasonable accommodations, must be able to:

  1. Have the ability to sufficiently perform kitchen, externship, dining room, café, and classroom activities and procedures. Examples of relevant activities include, but are not limited to, the ability to:
  1. Work in a refrigerated classroom.
  2. Lift and transport food, including hot food, as well as other culinary or baking product, equipment, small wares, and utensils.
  3. Lift and transport trays with plated foods, small wares, and other items, and serve and clear tables where guests are seated.
  4. Safely pour and serve liquids and beverages, including hot liquids.
  5. Safely handle hot foods such as pulled sugar or other items coming out of a heat source.
  6. Safely use knives for food preparation as well as other commercial cooking, baking, or serving utensils.
  7. Perform repetitive motion skills required in the kitchen and the food industry, such as whisking, dicing, or piping.
  8. Follow and maintain the National Restaurant Association’s ServSafe® sanitation standards for safe food handling.
  9. Safely and effectively operate standard commercial cooking and foodservice equipment.
  10. Participate and/or work in an environment where commercial microwaves and convection ovens are being used continuously.
  11. Test and evaluate food and beverage products.
  12. Produce food products within the time parameters designated by a course objective within a class or for a hands-on cooking or baking practical exam.
  13. Handle and cook different varieties of fish, seafood, beef, pork, chicken, lamb, venison, or other meats, vegetables, and fruit products.
  14. Handle and bake/cook using different flours—including all grains—as well as chocolate, fruits, and nuts.
  1. Attend and actively participate in all classroom courses.
  2. Attend and actively participate in production kitchen classes; instructional kitchen classes; dining room, café, and/or laboratory classes; and externship, for a minimum of seven consecutive hours per session, noting that those sessions may start at different hours of the day.
  3. Communicate effectively and professionally when interacting with peers, faculty, staff, other college personnel, guests, and employers. Examples of relevant communication activity include, but are not limited to:
  1. Use of effective verbal and/or nonverbal communication skills
  2. Effective utilization of the English language
  3. Ability to interpret communication from other people and respond in a professional fashion
  1. Have the ability to meet and perform sufficiently all course objectives that are essential in all classroom, laboratory, dining room, café, externship, and kitchen courses. Examples of relevant cognitive ability include, but are not limited to, the ability to:
  1. Learn and benefit from the college’s curriculum.
  2. Follow directions.
  3. Reason and perform independently.
  4. Process information accurately and thoroughly and prioritize tasks.
  5. Demonstrate skills of recall using both long- and short-term memory.
  6. Apply knowledge.
  7. Perform mathematical computations.
  8. Write essays, reports, and research projects as well as complete other college-level writing assignments.
  9. Demonstrate the conceptual, integrative, and analytical skills necessary for problem solving and critical thinking.
  1. Have the emotional stability, as well as the behavioral and social attributes, required to work individually and in teams within classrooms, laboratories, dining rooms, cafés, kitchen environments, and at externship locations. Examples of relevant activities include, but are not limited to, the ability to:
  1. Develop professional working relationships with classmates, instructors, guests, employers, and others.
  2. Function effectively under stress and regulate one’s own emotional reaction.
  3. Adapt to multiple situations and perform multiple tasks.
  4. Adhere to the college’s Student Code of Conduct.
  5. Exercise sound judgment.
  6. Focus and maintain attention on tasks.
  7. Self-manage medical or emotional conditions.
  1. Have the ability to sufficiently maintain the safety and well-being of fellow students without posing a safety threat to others in all environments on campus, and during externship and other college-sponsored trips.

Competency-Based Curriculum

The CIA’s skill-based competency curriculum recognizes a fixed standard of educational achievement, rather than a standard that compares a student’s accomplishments to the rest of the group. Students must pass all courses and comprehensive practical exams to earn their degree or certificate. To pass a course, students must achieve a minimum mastery level for all of the skill-based competencies identified for that course. The criteria for the mastery level are listed in the course guide and explained by the instructor, based upon considerations such as reasonable expectations of student skill levels.

Students who are unable to master one of the skill-based competencies will have a chance to practice further with a Skills Remediation assignment to successfully master that skill-based competency. If students are unable to master the skill-based competency through Skills Remediation, they must repeat the entire course.

Satisfactory Academic Progress for Financial Aid Eligibility

In order to maintain eligibility for financial aid, a student must maintain satisfactory academic progress , which is measured quantitatively and qualitatively each academic term.

Academic Progress—Degree Programs and ACAP

Students are expected to maintain satisfactory academic progress and move efficiently through the program by passing all courses and assessments, and maintaining a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 1.75 at the end of the first semester and a 2.0 for all subsequent semesters. Student grades may be reviewed at any time. A student will not be considered making satisfactory academic progress if he or she:

  • Has a cumulative GPA below 1.75 at the end of the first semester of the associate degree program or the first nine weeks of a certificate program, or
  • Has a semester GPA below 2.0 for any subsequent semester.

Students not making satisfactory academic progress will be placed on academic probation or dismissed from the CIA.

Academic Probation and Dismissal

Academic probation provides students with an opportunity to improve their academic standing while still enrolled in the program. Students who do not attain a 1.75 cumulative grade point average (GPA) at the end of the first semester (or in the first nine weeks of the certificate program) or do not attain a 2.0 cumulative GPA in subsequent semesters are placed on academic probation. Academic probation will be communicated in writing by the dean of academic engagement and administration. Students on academic probation must meet with a member of the Learning Strategies Center/Library Learning Commons to address study skill issues and to sign the required Academic Contract. The contract will specify the academic support activities best suited for the student’s success. Students at the Singapore campus must meet with the managing director. While on academic probation, students will have their GPA audited throughout the semester.

Academic dismissal will be rendered if a student:

  • Has been on academic probation during the last semester completed and is unable to maintain a GPA of 2.0 by the end of the current semester, or
  • Fails a course three times.

Academic Probation and Academic Dismissal will be recorded on the student’s transcript. The college’s Withdrawal Refund Policy will apply.

Appeal

A student who wishes to appeal a dismissal may do so as follows:

  • Submit the appeal within two weeks from the date the dismissal letter was issued.
  • Meet with his or her academic advisor to discuss the concerns.
  • Submit the Academic Dismissal Appeal form and supporting documentation to the Registrar’s Office, Student Financial and Registration Services (NY), the Education Office (CA and TX), or the managing director (SG).
  • Prepare for a meeting with the Academic Standards Committee if the registrar, director of education, or managing director determines that the written appeal warrants a meeting to discuss the request for reinstatement.

Students granted reinstatement must submit a request for readmission to Student Financial and Registration Services, the Education Office, or the managing director a minimum of 60 days prior to a reentry date. Reentry dates will be based on space availability in the class or semester in which the student wants to return.

Academic Standards Committee

In addition to hearing appeals for academic dismissal, the Academic Standards Committee also meets with students who:

  • Are being reviewed for violations of Academic Honesty, or
  • Have failed the baking and pastry or culinary practical examinations four times.

If a student fails to appear before the Academic Standards Committee, no other appeal is allowed. The decision of the Academic Standards Committee is final.

Academic Progress—WBGC

Graduate students must maintain at least a 3.0 cumulative GPA to be in good academic standing. If the cumulative GPA falls below 3.0, the graduate student will be placed on academic probation and will be required to meet with the director of education. If the student’s cumulative GPA does not meet the required 3.0 at the end of the probation period, the certificate will not be conferred. If the student wants to appeal the decision, a final appeal may be made to the provost.

Graduate students will be permitted to repeat classes for which they have previously earned a grade of “C” once. The previous “C” grade remains on the student’s transcript, but is not included in the calculation of his or her grade point average. The higher grade will be calculated in the student’s grade point average. Graduate students repeating courses are advised that the course may not be offered each semester, and must consult with Student Financial and Registration Services to prevent scheduling conflicts and to review potential financial aid implications. Please review GPA and completion rate information under Satisfactory Academic Progress .

Academic Probation

Academic probation provides students with an opportunity to improve their academic standing while still enrolled in the program. Students who do not attain a 3.0 cumulative grade point average (GPA) at the end of the first semester are placed on academic probation. Academic probation will be communicated in writing by the director of education at the California campus and recorded on the student’s transcript. Academic support services are available to all students.

Attendance—Degree Programs and ACAP

Class Attendance

Given the demands of the college’s degree and certificate programs, the amount of material covered in classes, and the nature of the curriculum, students are required to arrive on time and remain in class for all class sessions. Students who miss more than a specific number of classes within a course will automatically fail that course and must repeat the entire course. Students who miss more than a specific number of classes throughout the 30-week, two-year, or four-year program will be suspended. Each faculty member may have established his or her own requirements regarding attendance. Refer to course guides for all such requirements. Students are responsible for finding out the specific requirements for each particular class and instructor.

Missing Classes for Freshmen and Sophomore (U.S. Campuses)

If a student is absent for a class in which daily participation is graded, the student will receive a grade of zero for that class. Students who miss more than a specified number of classes in a course (as follows) shall automatically fail that course and will have to retake it:

  • Two classes in a 1.5- or three-credit, 12-, 13-, 14-, or 15-day course, or in a 14- or 15-week course.
  • Four classes in a six-credit course.
  • Four classes in the three-credit College Writing course that meets over the course of 12 weeks.
  • One class in a 1.5-credit course that meets eight or fewer times.

Missing Classes for Juniors and Seniors (New York Campus)

If a student misses more than six classes in a three-credit course, he or she will automatically fail that course. The student will have to retake the course. For three-credit courses that meet only once per week, each absence counts as two absences.

Missing Classes for Culinary Science Juniors and Seniors (New York Campus)

If a student misses more than two classes in a three-credit culinary science course—other than Culinary Science: Principles and Applications (CUSC-300) —he or she will automatically fail that course. If a student misses more than six classes in Culinary Science: Principles and Applications, he or she will automatically fail that course.

Missing Classes (CIA Singapore)

If a student is absent for a class in which daily participation is graded, the student will receive a grade of zero for that class. Students who miss more than two classes in a 1.5- or three-credit, 12-, 13-, 14-, or 15-day course; or more than six classes in a three-credit course; will automatically fail that course and will have to retake the course unless the student has been administratively withdrawn from the course prior to the course end. Students who miss more than four classes in a six-credit course will automatically fail that course and will have to retake it.

For three-credit courses that meet only once per week, each absence counts as two absences.

Major Vacations

Students who miss class(es) on either the day before or the day after the April vacation (bachelor’s students and students at the California campus only) or the August or December vacations (all campuses) will earn two absences for each class that they miss. Students should verify class schedules with their instructors before making any travel plans for these vacation periods.

Attendance Probation for Cumulative Absences

Students who miss 10 classes in the freshman and sophomore years will be reminded of attendance policy, placed on attendance probation, and warned of possible suspension or dismissal by the Student Affairs Office or its designee. In cases where two or more courses meet in one day, each class that a student misses counts as one absence. Certificate program students can miss no more than five classes for the 30-week duration of the program and still be considered for graduation. In semesters where two or more courses meet in one day, each class that a student misses will count as one absence per class. If a student misses four classes, the student may be placed on attendance probation. In the bachelor’s degree program in Singapore, students who miss 10 or more classes may be suspended by the Attendance Committee.

Because juniors and seniors normally attend three classes a day, students who miss 24 classes in the junior and senior years will be reminded of the attendance policy, placed on attendance probation, and warned of possible suspension or dismissal by the Student Affairs Office or its designee. Each class a student misses counts as one absence.

Attendance Review

Students on attendance probation who miss additional classes may be required to attend a meeting of the Attendance Committee.

Students who do not attend the scheduled meeting of the Attendance Committee will be automatically suspended, and the Committee will determine whether and under what conditions the students will be allowed to continue their studies at the college.

Attendance Suspension (Degree Programs)

Freshmen and sophomores who accumulate more than 18 absences in their freshman and sophomore years may be suspended from the college by the Attendance Committee. Medical, legal, and family emergency reasons for missing classes will be taken into account by the Attendance Committee so long as students notify the Student Affairs Office or its designee at the time and can provide the Office with appropriate documentation.

Juniors and seniors who accumulate more than 36 absences in their junior and senior year may be suspended from the college by the Attendance Committee. Medical, legal, and family emergency reasons for missing classes will be taken into account by the Attendance Committee so long as students notify the Student Affairs Office or its designee at the time and can provide appropriate documentation.

Attendance Suspension (ACAP)

Students who accumulate more than four absences within the 30-week ACAP may be suspended from the college by the Standards Committee. Medical, legal, and family emergency reasons for missing classes will be taken into account by the Standards Committee as long as the student notifies the student affairs manager at the time and can provide appropriate documentation.

Personal Emergencies and Exceptional Circumstances

If a student is forced to miss a class due to sickness, personal emergencies, or unforeseen circumstances, the student must notify the Health Services Office or the Student Affairs Office (U.S. campuses) or the Administrator’s Office (SG), who will notify the faculty member. Depending on the nature of the situation and the academic circumstances, the dean of student affairs, student affairs manager, or managing director, after consultation with the faculty member, may recommend a withdrawal from the course.

In exceptional circumstances and if the student has not exceeded the maximum number of absences that would cause one to fail the course, the faculty member may assign additional work and give partial credit for a missed class.

In the event that a student is sick on the day(s) of his or her practical exam and/or make-up practical exam, he or she should (if possible) go directly to Health Services or to a physician for an evaluation. If warranted, Health Services or the student affairs manager will issue a sick note (or Medical Certificate in Singapore) for the student to take to the exam proctor, who will inform Student Financial and Registration Services of the No Show due to sickness. After a discussion with the student, the student financial and registration advisor (NY), registration manager (CA), student affairs coordinator (TX), or managing director (SG) will re-schedule the test date, and the student will not be charged for the new test date. Baking and pastry arts students should refer to their practical exam criteria for the baking and pastry two-day practical examination for additional grading criteria and information.

Religious Holidays/Military Reservist Duty

Students who are observing a religious holiday or have required military reservist duty that coincides with regularly scheduled class days are excused for that time period. In such cases, students can be excused for no more than two days of that class, and will be held accountable for information they missed. If students need to take more than two days for religious or military service reasons, they will be required to withdraw from the course. As a participant in religious or military reservist activities, students will not be academically penalized for missing class.

Attendance Committee

The members of the Attendance Committee will include the dean of student affairs (as chair) or his or her designee, an associate dean or director of education, two faculty members, and the registrar or his or her designee.

Since the decision of the Attendance Committee is final, there is no appeal.

Attendance—WBGC

To maintain the academic integrity of the Wine and Beverage Graduate Certificate Program (WBGC) and meet the learning objectives, students are expected to attend all classes, meet all deadlines, and be present for examinations. Absences will undermine the focus of class discussions and student interaction. Absences may be excused in exceptional circumstances, with permission of the instructor and completion of make-up work assigned.

Grading—Degree Programs and ACAP

The college operates on a quality-point alpha grading system for the degree programs and ACAP as follows:

Grade/
Symbol
Numeric
Range
Quality
Points
 
  A 95–100 4.00  
  A- 90–94 3.66  
  B+ 87–89 3.33  
  B 84–86 3.00  
  B- 80–83 2.66  
  C+ 77–79 2.33  
  C 74–76 2.00  
  C- 70–73 1.66  
  D 65–69 1.00  
  F <65 0.00  
  P N/A 0.00  
  HP N/A 0.00  
  NS N/A 0.00  
  I N/A 0.00  
  W N/A 0.00  
  WF N/A 0.00  
  TC N/A 0.00  
  AU N/A 0.00  
  IP N/A 0.00  

At the end of each course, a student’s grades will be posted on CIA Main Menu. If the student feels there has been a grading error, he or she should immediately contact the instructor, who may authorize a Grade Correction Form to correct the error.

Grading—WBGC

The college operates on a quality-point alpha grading system for the WBGC as follows:

  Grade/ Symbol Numeric Range Quality Points  
  A 95–100 4.00  
  A- 90–94 3.66  
  B+ 87–89 3.33  
  B 84–86 3.00  
  B- 80–83 2.66  
  C+ 77–79 2.33  
  C 74–76 2.00  
  F <74 0.00  
  P N/A 0.00  
  I N/A 0.00  
  W N/A 0.00  
  WF N/A 0.00  
  TC N/A 0.00  
  AU N/A 0.00  
  IP N/A 0.00  

At the end of each course, a student’s grades will be posted on CIA Main Menu. If the student feels there has been a grading error, he or she should immediately contact the instructor, who may authorize a Grade Correction Form to correct the error.

Calculating a Grade Point Average (GPA)

The GPA is calculated by multiplying the credits earned by the grade points for each course separately to calculate the quality points. All the quality points are then added together, and the total is divided by credits earned, including credits for “F” grades that have not been repeated.

Example:

BUSM-245  1.5 credits—grade: B+  
CULP-115 3.0 credits—grade: C

1.5 CREDITS x 3.33 (B+) = 4.995 QUALITY POINTS
3.0 CREDITS x 2.00 (C) = 6.00 QUALITY POINTS

4.5 TOTAL CREDITS = 10.995 TOTAL QUALITY POINTS

10.995 (TOTAL QUALITY POINTS) ÷ 4.5 (TOTAL CREDITS)
  = 2.44 GPA

Grading Symbols

I Incomplete: This grade indicates a student hasn’t completed all the course requirements. It may also indicate failure to master specific course competencies. Freshmen and sophomores must make up all course requirements before they can begin the next semester. Juniors and seniors must make individual arrangements with the associate dean for liberal arts before they can begin the next semester. If students do not complete the course by the specified date, they will automatically fail the course and be required to make up the entire course at the cost of full tuition.
W/WF Withdrawal/Withdrawal Failure: The grade of “W” is assigned to a student who officially withdraws from a course before the last day to withdraw as outlined in the Course Withdrawal Timeline. Withdrawal after this period results in a grade of “WF.”
P Pass: Given for cooking, wine and service, and baking and pastry practical exams and some pass-fail courses.
HP High Pass: Given for cooking, wine and service, and baking and pastry practical examinations.
TC Transfer Credit: Denotes that credit for a course was transferred from another college.
NS No Show: Given only for cooking, wine and service, and baking and pastry practical exams and externship prep seminars if a student never showed up to take them. Note: if a practical exam or externship prep seminar is missed for this reason, it is recorded as an absence.
NG No Grade: This grade is automatically given if a student is on a roster and the instructor fails to give a grade or if the student hasn’t officially withdrawn from a course.
AU Audit: This symbol indicates that a student did not take the course for credit and the instructor of this course did not make an evaluation to issue a grade.
IP In Progress: This symbol indicates that grades have not been submitted and/or processed.

At the end of each course, the instructor will issue a grade. Clarification about the grade can be obtained by contacting the instructor immediately.

Skills Remediation

CIA faculty in the culinary arts degree programs and the certificate program will assign a student to attend Skills Remediation for a specific competency or competencies for the following reasons only:

  1. The student has failed to demonstrate proficiency in the competency during his or her class.
  2. The student has missed the competency in his or her class due to absence.

Scheduling

Student Financial and Registration Services (NY), the assistant director of student affairs’ office (CA), the director of education’s office (TX), or the managing director’s office (SG), upon receiving the Skills Remediation Kitchen Assignment form from the faculty member, will schedule the student to take part in Skills Remediation.

Grades

If a student is scheduled to attend Skills Remediation and has not successfully completed the remediation assignment prior to the end of the course, he or she will carry a grade of Incomplete (I). Once the student has demonstrated proficiency in the competency in question during Skills Remediation, the assigning faculty member will change the grade (which is based on the student’s actual attendance and performance in the class, and will not include his or her Skills Remediation performance) and submit the grade change.

Skills Remediation Attempts

Students will be allowed up to three attempts to achieve proficiency in a single competency. If a student fails to show proficiency after three attempts, or has carried an Incomplete for more than nine weeks, he or she will be required to meet with the dean of academic engagement and administration (NY), director of education (CA and TX), or managing director (SG).

Fee

The fee for attending a Skills Remediation session is $60, which will be billed to the student’s account.

Problems with a Grade

Students who have a concern about a grade received in any class should follow this process:

  1. Speak with the instructor of that particular class.
  2. If the instructor is unable to satisfy the student’s concern or to answer his or her questions fully, the student should submit his or her concerns in writing to the Grade Review Committee (or the Standards Committee at the California campus). The student’s written statement must be received within three weeks of the date the instructor submits the grades. Grade review forms are available on CIA Main Menu.
  3. The student will be invited to address the Grade Review Committee/Standards Committee to express his or her concerns. The committee will also review information provided by the instructor and will then decide what action to recommend to the instructor.
  4. The decision of the instructor is final.

Problems with a Class

Students who have other concerns about a class should follow the process below:

  1. Speak with the instructor of that particular class.
  2. If the instructor is unable to resolve the problem or fully answer the student’s questions, the student should make an appointment to see the associate dean or director responsible for that area.
  3. If the problem is not resolved to the student’s satisfaction, the student should make an appointment to see the appropriate academic dean or education director.
  4. The decision of the academic dean, education director, or managing director (SG) is final.

Incomplete Grades

Incomplete grades shall be assigned by faculty members when a student has not yet completed the work for a course and the faculty member agrees to provide a student more time to finish the course. Students shall have no more than nine weeks from the end of the date of the course to submit any incomplete work to the faculty member. Students who do not finish their incomplete work in the period required will receive an “F” grade since an incomplete grade will be automatically converted to a failing grade nine weeks after the date of the end of the course.

In order to be eligible for an incomplete grade, a student must:

  • Have already completed at least three quarters of the work in a course,
  • Have a passing grade on the work already submitted in the course, and
  • Sign an Incomplete Grade Agreement that indicates the remaining work to be done, the time frame to accomplish that work, and the consequences of not completing the work on time or in a quality manner.

The Incomplete Grade Agreement shall be signed by the student and faculty member and a copy shall be filed in the student’s permanent file along with the class roster on which the grades are recorded.

In addition, incomplete grades:

  • Shall not be given for students who will fail the course due to absences,
  • Cannot be used for a student retaking a final examination (with the exception of a score less than 75 on the National Restaurant Association ServSafe® certification exam), and
  • Will not be included in the calculation of a student’s grade point average (GPA).

Transcripts

Students are encouraged to keep a personal record of their grades. Official transcripts, bearing the CIA seal and authorized signatures, will be sent at the student’s request to prospective employers or to a college where the student has applied for admission. Transcripts are issued from the Registrar’s Office after the student submits a written or online request. There is a fee for official transcripts. Official transcripts will not be issued to students or former students with outstanding financial obligations.

Degree and Certificate Eligibility

The current Academic Catalog in effect at the time of admission to the CIA describes the academic requirements, policies, and responsibilities obligatory to both students and the college. Should academic requirements and/or policies change during a student’s uninterrupted course of study, the student is not required to abide by the changes unless it is specifically stated otherwise. The catalog at the time of admission will serve as the guide.

Students experiencing an interruption of study lasting a year or more must request readmission. For the full policy on readmission to The Culinary Institute of America, please see the Readmission Policy . The catalog in effect at the time of readmission will determine the academic requirements needed for the student to complete the degree or certificate program. The CIA will not waive any new requirements, but will make every effort to minimize the impact of such changes on the student.

Students requesting readmission into degree programs that began prior to 2002 (the year of the CIA’s accreditation by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education) will be required to complete College Writing (ENGL-120) , request transfer credit for the course taken at another accredited college or university, or score 50 or higher on the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) Composition Modular (no essay). See Transfer Credit  for more details.

A student who has successfully completed all courses, maintained the minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 required for graduation, and met all attendance requirements will be considered an eligible candidate for his or her earned degree or certificate. Degrees and certificates are conferred at the conclusion of the student’s final semester regardless of the end date of the final course or practical examination.

Commencement Ceremony Participation

The Registrar’s Office conducts graduation audits and is responsible for certifying that every student is eligible to participate in commencement exercises. For the associate degree commencement, this audit will be conducted during the second semester of the sophomore year. For the bachelor’s degree commencement, the audit will be conducted during the second semester of the senior year. For commencement from the certificate programs, the audit will be conducted during the second semester of the program.

Students are expected to complete all program requirements with a minimum GPA of 2.0 to be eligible for graduation. Students will be permitted to walk in the commencement ceremony with six credits outstanding as long as the student is registered in the subsequent semester and has arranged a method of payment. All students, including those requesting to participate in the commencement ceremony with academic requirements outstanding, must complete a graduation application and receive approval from the registrar at least three weeks prior to the commencement ceremony date. Requests submitted less than three weeks prior to the ceremony cannot be accommodated.

Students will be acknowledged by their proper names during the ceremony and in the commencement program. Participation in the commencement ceremony is not verification that a student has met all of the academic requirements and has earned the degree or certificate—all requirements must be completed satisfactorily to be considered graduated.

Upon final review, once all grades have been submitted, library books returned, outstanding fees and charges paid, and/or outstanding disciplinary actions resolved, diplomas will be distributed.

Commencement Awards

Qualified students will be recognized at the graduation ceremony with awards to honor their academic achievement and distinguished service. Graduation awards are specific to the student’s program and campus where they are enrolled.

Bachelor’s

The CIA presents the following awards to deserving students graduating from the college’s bachelor’s degree programs:

Craig Claiborne Communication Award
Awarded to the student who consistently writes in an engaging, erudite, and thought-provoking style; demonstrates a willingness and ability to express himself or herself orally; and elicits earnest consideration from listeners. A minimum cumulative GPA of 3.5 or higher, a minimum of 42 institutional credits in the bachelor’s curriculum, and no outstanding courses at the time of the ceremony are required.

Dean’s Applied Food Studies Award
Given to the student who demonstrates, through a strong record of scholarship and service to the community, a commitment to advancing the field of food studies and achieves a GPA of 3.5 or higher in the required applied food studies courses.

Founders’ Management Award
Awarded to a student who demonstrates critical thinking, communicates well, participates in class activities, and maintains a GPA or 3.5 or higher in the required management courses.

Jacob Rosenthal Leadership Award
For exemplary leadership and professionalism inside and outside the classroom.

Julius Wile Academic Achievement Award
Awarded to the student with the highest GPA earned with a minimum of 42 institutional credits in the bachelor’s curriculum and with no outstanding courses at the time of the ceremony.

President’s Humanities Award
Awarded to the student who demonstrates, in written works and spoken comments, an intellectual curiosity in the tradition of humanist thinking; weighs evidence; analyzes information; and uses sound reasoning to substantiate opinions. This student goes beyond the expectations for most assignments. A minimum cumulative GPA of 3.5 or higher, a minimum of 42 institutional credits in the bachelor’s curriculum, and no outstanding courses at the time of the ceremony are required.

Provost’s Culinary Science Award
Awarded to a student who demonstrates scientific literacy, cross-disciplinary thinking skills, and a sincere desire to address the challenges and opportunities of an increasingly complex food system, and earns a GPA of 3.5 or higher in the required culinary science courses.

Bachelor’s and Associate

The college presents the following awards to qualified graduating students:

The Culinary Institute of America Judiciary Award
Given to a student who has successfully completed 15 weeks of service and is recommended for this award by the Judiciary Board’s advisors.

The Culinary Institute of America Student Government Service Award
Given to a student who has completed a distinguished period of service and accomplishment and is recommended for this award by the SGA advisors.

Associate in Culinary Arts

Special awards for deserving students in the associate in culinary arts degree program are presented at commencement. These include:

Culinary Award
Recognizes the student with excellent skills in culinary arts.

Frances Roth Leadership Award
For outstanding leadership, professionalism, and service to the college.

Katharine Angell Academic Achievement Award
Given to the student with the highest GPA through the Contemporary Hospitality and Service Management class.

Management Award
For excellence in management classes.

The Young Professional’s Medal of Merit of the Académie Brillat-Savarin
Given to a student demonstrating excellence in wine knowledge.

Associate in Baking and Pastry Arts

Special awards for deserving students in the associate in baking and pastry arts degree program are presented at commencement. These include:

Frances Roth Leadership Award
For outstanding leadership, professionalism, and service to the college.

Katharine Angell Academic Achievement Award
Given to the student with the highest GPA through the Beverages and Customer Service class.

Management Award
For excellence in management classes.

St. Honoré Baking and Pastry Award
Awarded to the student with excellent skills in baking and pastry courses.

The Young Professional’s Medal of Merit of the Académie Brillat-Savarin
Given to a student demonstrating excellence in wine knowledge.

Accelerated Culinary Arts Certificate Program

Commencement awards for this program include:

ACAP Student Achievement Award
Recognizes one student who has achieved a high standard of performance as determined by the faculty.

Culinary Award
Recognizes the student with excellent skills in culinary arts.

Wine and Beverage Graduate Certificate Program

The college presents the following awards to qualified graduating students:

The Student Achievement Award
For high achievement as determined by the faculty.

Graduate Certificate Professional Excellence Award
Awarded to a graduating student who demonstrates exceptional service as determined by the class.

Academic Honors

Academic honors will be awarded to students who have earned their degrees and have attained commendable cumulative grade point averages at the CIA. Those students anticipated to receive honors are recognized in the graduation ceremony program. Notations will be made on the diploma once all grades and cumulative GPAs have been verified.

Bachelor’s Degrees

Summa Cum Laude (with highest honor): 3.80 or higher GPA
Magna Cum Laude (with high honor): 3.60 to 3.79 GPA
Cum Laude (with honor): 3.40 to 3.59 GPA

Associate Degrees

High Honors: 3.75 or higher GPA
Honors: 3.50 to 3.74 GPA

Perfect Attendance

Students who have a perfect attendance record at the completion of their program (associate or associate/bachelor’s) will receive a certificate of merit along with a notation on their diploma.

Withdrawals

Withdrawal from the CIA is granted when a student anticipates that he or she will not be returning to the college. Students will be placed on withdrawal at the time that a requested leave of absence exceeds 180 days, or if they do not continue attending classes and have not received approval for a leave of absence in writing. Students are required to make a request for withdrawal to the Center for Career and Academic Advising. Students who withdraw from the CIA after the add/drop period will be assigned a non-punitive grade of “W” or a punitive grade of “WF” depending on the time of the withdrawal within the semester.

After a withdrawal, students are responsible for any curriculum modifications that occurred during their absence, even if they were already beyond that point in the curriculum. Students at the U.S. campuses will be charged tuition and fees based on the college’s Withdrawal Refund Policy for the appropriate campus, found in the Tuition and Fees  section. If a student has federal loans, once he or she withdraws, repayment of loans may begin within six months. CIA Singapore students should contact SIT regarding any applicable charges.

Externship candidates who have not provided the Center for Career and Academic Advising with a signed training agreement from an approved externship site within the first three weeks of the externship semester will be officially withdrawn. If the student leaves his or her externship site prior to the agreed-upon timeframe for whatever reason, he or she will be considered as not being enrolled in class and will be withdrawn.

Students who encounter a serious medical problem that prevents them from continuing to attend classes must immediately request a withdrawal from the appropriate department:

  • New York campus—Student Affairs Office (Health Services or Counseling and Psychological Services)
  • California campus—Student Affairs Office
  • Texas campus—Student Affairs Office
  • CIA Singapore—Managing Director’s Office

Temporary Medical Condition

Due to essential hygiene reasons and the safety of oneself or others, students who have a medical condition requiring a hard or soft cast on an upper or lower limb, a sling, or the use of crutches will not be permitted in culinary, baking, pastry, or table service classes.

Students who have any other temporary medical condition that significantly affects mobility or normal stride, prevents the wearing of required footwear, or causes restricted vision will not be permitted in culinary, baking and pastry, or table service classes.

In addition, any splint, cast, sling, boot, brace, or wrap that affects the ability to receive first aid treatment to the covered body part in cases of cuts or burns would also prohibit the student from participating in the above classes.

When the student’s condition is fully healed, he or she must present signed documentation from a health care provider indicating that the student is permitted to resume culinary, baking, pastry, or table service classes to Health Services (NY), the assistant director of student life (CA), the manager of student services (TX), or the managing director (SG).

If a currently enrolled student cannot remain in a class at the time of the injury, the college may withdraw the student from the class. If the student is unable to resume any courses, he or she will be withdrawn for that semester.

Leave of Absence

A leave of absence (LOA) will only be granted between semesters for military service or medical, personal, or financial situations in which a student may find it impossible to continue in regularly scheduled classes without interruption. Students may not take an LOA in lieu of disciplinary action or to delay their return to the CIA from externship. Regardless of semester, all students may request an LOA upon the completion of a semester and prior to the beginning of a new semester with appropriate approval.

To qualify for a leave of absence, students must meet with an advisor in the Center for Career and Academic Advising and provide a reasonable expectation of their return to the CIA. Supporting documentation will be required by the college to grant the LOA. A leave of absence is valid for a period of up to 180 calendar days within each calendar year. Leaves of absence from all U.S. campuses are granted with the approval of the director of student financial and registration services. Students returning from a leave of absence must contact the Center for Career and Academic Advising a minimum of six weeks prior to their anticipated return date to confirm course availability.

Students at the U.S. campuses who leave the CIA without requesting a leave of absence will be unofficially withdrawn from the college. This may result in additional campus housing charges, a delay in obtaining any housing refund, failing grades due to absences, and/or a delay in returning to classes.

Withdrawal from the CIA could affect a student’s financial aid, including loan repayment terms and/or loan grace periods. If a student fails to return from a leave of absence, he or she will be automatically withdrawn, and the schedule for a withdrawal refund will apply effective from his or her last day of attendance (as indicated in the student’s leave of absence record).

Students at the CIA Singapore who leave the CIA without requesting a leave of absence will be withdrawn from the college and may incur financial and/or academic consequences. For more information, students should contact Financial Services at the Singapore Institute of Technology (SIT).

Professionalism, Uniform, and Hygiene—Degree Programs and ACAP

Professionalism

As professionals at The Culinary Institute of America, we are constantly working to enhance the status of the hospitality industry. Students, faculty, staff, and alumni all share a common pride in their work, workplace, and appearance. We have all chosen the hospitality industry as our vocation. It is an ancient and respected profession. It takes many years of hard work, training, dedication, and tenacity to become a leader in this industry, but it takes only a few moments to dress, act, and think like a professional. The following standards of conduct are expected of anyone who aspires to be regarded as a professional in the hospitality industry.

Professionals:

  • refrain from abusive and foul language;
  • speak and act without prejudice to race, color, creed, religion, age, gender, disability, ethnicity, veteran status, marital status, or sexual orientation;
  • demonstrate and adhere to ethical business practices, with due respect for customers and colleagues;
  • promote understanding and respect for those alcoholic beverages used in the hospitality industry;
  • refrain from the abuse of drugs and alcohol;
  • treat all equipment and property with respect as if personal property;
  • are polite and courteous to all visitors, peers, and colleagues;
  • work with a positive attitude;
  • dedicate themselves to learning;
  • stay open-minded to the opinions of others;
  • share knowledge with others;
  • act reliably and dependably; and
  • act with honesty and integrity in their interactions with all people.

Personal Hygiene

Every professional in the culinary field should be acutely aware of the necessity to maintain the highest standards of personal hygiene and to present a businesslike appearance at all times. In the early stages of your program, you are issued the ServSafe® textbook, which discusses personal hygiene in detail. It is the responsibility of all foodservice professionals to bathe or shower, practice oral hygiene, and use deodorant daily.

Food Safety and Kitchen Sanitation

The CIA has developed comprehensive food safety and sanitation programs. You are responsible for food safety and food preparation area sanitation as an integral part of your learning experience, and are expected to abide by the guidelines set forth in each food production area. You are expected to taste food in kitchens using tasting spoons. Eating is allowed only in designated dining areas. Drinking liquid from a closed container and away from the workstation is the only acceptable way to consume liquids in kitchens and classrooms.

Uniform Care

You are expected to wear your uniform with pride and make sure it is neat and clean at the start of each class. Sitting on the floor, the ground, or the stairs in your uniform is not acceptable. The maintenance of your appearance is a professional matter; therefore, you are responsible for laundering and ironing your own uniform. For students living on campus, laundry facilities are located in each residence hall for your convenience.

Alterations to your uniform are your responsibility. In the event uniforms do not fit properly, return them within five days of receiving them to Central Issuing in Roth Hall (NY), the Education Department (CA), or the Student Services Center (TX). New uniforms will be issued within five days.

The Student Dress Code

General

Promoting an environment where students learn to dress professionally is one of the ways in which the CIA helps its graduates achieve success. As such, the students, faculty, and administration of the college share the responsibility to maintain a Student Dress Code. While we present the code as a set of rules and requirements, we aspire to create a culture of enthusiastic cooperation and self-governance among the student body itself.

The Student Dress Code must be observed in all academic buildings on days, and during hours, that the campus is open for student and/or public access:

  • Roth Hall, McCann Education Annex, East Wing, Colavita Center, Admissions Center, Marriott Pavilion (NY)
  • Greystone main building, Williams Center for Flavor Discovery, and Rudd Center for Professional Wine Studies (CA)
  • Teaching kitchens, lecture halls, and dining hall (TX)

The following are standards that are required when attending any class, or accessing any academic buildings:

  • You must be clean-shaven, with sideburns not exceeding the middle of the ear for men. Beards are not permitted.
  • Mustaches must be neatly trimmed and must not extend beyond the corner of the lips.
  • Facial jewelry (including spacers, gauges, etc.), in eyebrows, eyelids, lips, tongue, upper ear, or nose, is not permitted, and covering (with bandages, etc.) jewelry in place, such as piercings, is not acceptable.
  • Sheer or see-through clothing is not permitted.
  • Colored or logo T-shirts are not permitted.
  • Leather or denim clothing (of any color) is not permitted.
  • Hats, other than CIA-issued chef’s toques, are not to be worn.
  • In all instances, hair must be of a natural color, groomed, and clean.
  • Headphones are not acceptable in class, nor in hallways and public contact areas.
  • No excessive makeup, cologne, aftershave, or detectable sprays and lotions.

The particular type of dress required is dependent on the nature of the student’s class, as noted below. As a general rule, kitchen/lab classes require a chef’s uniform, hospitality and service management classes require a uniform specific to the restaurant/café/service setting, and all classroom-based courses require either a chef’s uniform or business professional attire. The required uniform is therefore not a function of a student’s academic status at the college (i.e., associate or bachelor’s degree program) but rather the context in which the class is held:

Chef’s Uniform

  • CIA-issued cleaned and pressed chef’s checkered pants of proper fit, neither pegged nor cuffed. Pants must be hemmed above the natural heel and below the ankle.
  • CIA-issued cleaned and pressed white chef’s jacket embroidered with your name. Sleeves of the chef’s jacket may be folded only to the wrist, except in cases where practicality of the work being done requires otherwise.
  • CIA-approved clean white neckerchief.
  • CIA-issued clean white hat.
  • CIA-issued cleaned and pressed apron.
  • Black or white socks (only), which cover the ankle.
  • One plain ring and one watch are the only jewelry permitted. A CIA-issued group leader or student government pin will be permitted on the right front collar of the uniform. In addition, veteran students are permitted to wear a CIA-issued pin that indicates their branch of service alongside the American flag. This pin must be worn on the left front collar of the uniform.
  • White undergarments are required for both men and women—colors or logos are not permitted.
  • The breast pocket of the chef’s jacket may only contain one clip-on pen, one clip-on thermometer, and notecards or a small notebook.
  • Fingernails should be short, trimmed, clean, neat, and free of polish.
  • For sanitation reasons, gloves, aprons, side towels, and hats are not worn during certain activities that might lead to contamination (i.e., going to the restroom, taking out the garbage), as well as in non-class activities such as entering or leaving academic buildings, or eating meals in student dining rooms.
  • For safety reasons, wallet chains, visible key rings, and straps are not permitted.
  • All students in culinary (including meat and fish fabrication) and baking classes must wear clean, polished, black, sturdy work shoes that provide support to stand and work for long hours. They must have a closed back, non-slip soles, and black laces (when applicable).
  • Hair must be restrained above the collar in a professional manner, with solid white or black hair restraints, barrettes, or scrunchies.
  • Anything not specified in this section may not be worn with the uniform. Uniforms must be complete and worn as designed.

Hospitality and Service Management Uniforms for Culinary Arts

  • Clean and pressed white dress shirt.
  • White undergarments are required for both men and women—colors or logos are not permitted.
  • CIA-issued ties are required.
  • CIA-issued pressed bistro apron and properly fitting CIA-issued black vest.
  • Clean and pressed black skirt (no more than two inches above the knee) with hosiery for women, or trousers for women and men. Pants must be hemmed above the natural heel and below the ankle. No jeans, pants with grommets, or leggings. Pants should not be taper fitted, but have a flow of hemmed trousers/slacks.
  • Plain flesh-colored or black hosiery (no prints or seams) with skirts for women.
  • Plain black socks (above the ankle) with trousers for men and women.
  • Clean, black, polished, leather, low-heeled dress shoes or closed-black clogs. Shoes must be slip-resistant.
  • One plain ring and one watch are the only pieces of jewelry permitted. Spacers and gauges are not permitted. No facial/dermal piercings.
  • Two black click pens (no logo), one de-crumber, and one corkscrew must be carried in the apron pocket.
  • Fingernails must be short, trimmed, clean, neat, and free of polish.
  • If pants have belt loops, a solid black belt is required.
  • Hair must be restrained in a professional manner and off the face, with solid white or black hair restraints, barrettes, or scrunchies.
  • For safety reasons, wallet chains, visible key rings, and straps are not permitted.
  • No excessive makeup, cologne, aftershave, or detectable sprays and lotions.

Hospitality and Service Management Uniforms for Baking & Pastry Arts

  • Clean and pressed café chef’s jacket (NY and TX).
  • Clean and pressed white long-sleeved shirt (CA).
  • CIA-issued bistro apron.
  • Clean and pressed black skirt with hosiery for women, or trousers for women and men. Pants must be hemmed above the natural heel and below the ankle. No jeans, pants with grommets, or leggings. Pants should not be taper fitted, but have a flow of hemmed trousers/slacks.
  • White undergarments are required for both men and women—colors or logos are not permitted.
  • Plain flesh-colored or black hosiery (no prints or seams) with skirts for women.
  • One plain ring and one watch are the only jewelry permitted.
  • Fingernails must be short, trimmed, clean, neat, and free of colored polish.
  • Clean, black, polished, low-heeled dress shoes or closed-back clogs. Shoes must be slip-resistant.
  • Hair must be restrained in a professional manner and off the face, with hair restraints or barrettes.
  • For safety reasons, wallet chains, visible key rings, and straps are not permitted.
  • No excessive makeup, cologne, aftershave, perfumes, or detectable sprays or lotions.

Student Maître d’Hôtel Uniform

  • Traditional business suit, or jacket, tie, and trousers for men.
  • Traditional business suit, dress, or skirt/blouse combination for women. No jeans, pants with grommets, or leggings. Pants should not be taper fitted, but have a flow of hemmed trousers/slacks.
  • Clean and pressed dress-style shirts appropriate to the suit worn.
  • Flesh-colored or dark hosiery/dark socks (that cover the ankle) only.
  • Clean and polished dress shoes. Platform shoes and those with excessive heels (more than two inches) are unsafe and are not acceptable.
  • Jewelry accessories permitted-one post or stud earring per earlobe, one necklace, one watch, one brooch/pin, one ring, and one bracelet. Leather and cloth jewelry are not permitted.

Classroom-based Courses

A chef’s uniform can be worn in any classroom setting. Otherwise, the following business professional attire must be worn:

  • Traditional business attire, such as suits, dresses, and sport coats, is recommended.
  • Ironed or pressed pants or skirts may be worn. Skirts need to be no shorter than two inches above the knee. Pants must be hemmed or cuffed. No shorts or capri pants. Leggings worn under clothing are acceptable.
  • Students are expected to dress neatly with clean and pressed shirts tucked in as appropriate. Turtlenecks and collared polo shirts are acceptable. T-shirts, or undershirts worn as outerwear, are not acceptable. Tops revealing bare shoulders, midriff, or cleavage are not permissible.
  • A sweater, tie, or sport jacket may be worn along with a collared shirt or turtleneck.
  • Shoes must be appropriate for wear at a professional business meeting. Sneakers, hiking sandals, shower shoes (flip-flops), or bedroom slippers, for example, are not acceptable. Platform shoes and those with excessive heels (more than two inches) are unsafe and unacceptable. Open-toe dress shoes for women may be worn; however, due to health and safety codes, they are not allowed in kitchens at any time, so plan accordingly.
  • Jewelry accessories are permitted; however, in the spirit of encouraging a professional environment, discretion is advised.
  • No sheer or see-through clothing is permitted.

Guidelines for Graduation Dress

In recognition of the commitment to professionalism and hospitality, students are expected to wear the following at graduation:

Associate Degrees, Bachelor’s Degree (Singapore), and Accelerated Culinary Arts Certificate Program

  • Flesh-colored or dark hosiery/dark socks only.
  • Clean and polished black dress shoes.
  • Black dress slacks or pants only.
  • CIA-issued, cleaned and pressed white graduation chef jacket buttoned to the top.
  • CIA-issued clean, white paper toque.
  • Hair must be a natural color, groomed, and clean.

Bachelor’s Degrees, New York Campus

  • CIA-issued black cap and gown.
  • Anything that shows below the gown must be a solid dark color (e.g., black or navy).
  • Flesh-colored or dark hosiery/dark socks only.
  • Clean and polished black dress shoes.
  • Hair must be a natural color, groomed, and clean.

Additional Considerations

  • Outerwear (sweaters, coats, hoodies, and sweatshirts) may not be worn into the kitchens or bakeshops. Please use the lockers provided to store these items.
  • Students with injuries that require casts, crutches, slings or other aids for temporary conditions that significantly impair mobility cannot take culinary, baking, or table service courses. Student Financial and Registration Services or the Education Office will make every effort to place the student in an appropriate business management course.
  • Students with hand cuts and lacerations must obtain clearance from the Health Services Office (NY), a JobCare official or a personal physician—with clearance verified by the student affairs manager (CA), or the director of education (TX) to attend kitchen and bakeshop classes.
  • For the fish butchery room, white turtlenecks or white thermal shirts may be worn without a neckerchief. This is the only area that this substitution may be made.
  • White cotton headbands may be worn in hot weather. However, no portion of the headband should be visible under the chef’s hat, and the headband must be removed when the chef’s hat is removed.

Students at the U.S. campuses who have a physical impairment as defined by section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 or Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, or who, because of religious beliefs/customs included in title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (amended by the Equal Employment Opportunity Act of 1972) are unable to shave facial hair as described above should submit appropriate documentation in writing for a variance to the associate vice president and dean of student affairs (NY), Learning Strategies Center administrator (CA), or director of education (TX). Exceptions to this code must be verified by a letter from the school official named prior and must be carried on the student’s person at all times.

Penalties for Non-Compliance

While students are in academic buildings on days campus is open, the uniform and dress code must be adhered to, and will be enforced. Students need to be in proper attire to be admitted to the dining rooms or self-service meal lines. The penalties for non-compliance with the dress code are consistent for all classes at the CIA:

  • Of the student’s final grade, 10% will be for Professionalism, Uniform, and Hygiene. The professor will assess each violation while students are in the class.
  • Students risk the possibility of having demerits issued.
  • Students who are non-compliant will be dismissed from class to make the needed corrections.

Students can avoid these penalties by demonstrating professionalism in all they do.

Academic Honesty

At The Culinary Institute of America, students are expected to develop their own ideas and to consult research materials for their studies. The CIA’s Academic Honesty code identifies expected behaviors and the consequences of failure to adhere to the expected behavior. The college expects all students to adhere to this policy.

The term “academic dishonesty” may refer to, but is not limited to, any of the following:

  • Cheating: Using unauthorized materials to complete work (e.g., using another student’s mise en place, copying off of a classmate’s paper, crib notes, phone, electronic devices, etc.)
  • Purchase/Sale: Using prepared materials from an organization or person whose business includes selling research papers, original papers, exams, or material to students for their use.
  • Misrepresentation: Submitting material previously submitted to another instructor or course without the permission of the current instructor, or submitting materials that have already been submitted to the same instructor by someone else.
  • Plagiarism: Copying from any source without giving credit; using original ideas, recipes, or research without giving credit; or working from another source without giving credit.
  • Fabrication: Falsification of sources, citations, information, data, and/or other work that is evaluated by the instructor.
  • Other: Stealing an exam or other materials from a faculty member. Intentionally destroying, altering, or obstructing another student’s or faculty member’s work, including another student’s mise en place. Unauthorized student collaboration on project, papers, or other assignments. Signing in for another student.

This behavior, or assisting others in this behavior, is a serious violation of professional and academic standards at the CIA and will not be tolerated.

Violations

A faculty member who identifies an act of academic dishonesty will discuss such incident with the student.

  • The faculty member will determine the consequences of a student’s academic dishonesty. Possible outcomes are dependent on the type of academic dishonesty and the decision of the faculty member. Possible consequences include, but are not limited to, a rewrite of the assignment, an additional assignment, a failing grade on the assignment, failure of the class, and/or an appearance before the Academic Standards Committee.
  • After any instance of academic dishonesty, if a faculty member finds a student’s behavior to be particularly egregious, the faculty member may, in consultation with the appropriate associate dean or education director, recommend academic probation for the student.

In each case, the faculty member will inform the student in person and by letter, a copy of which will be sent to the education director, associate dean, and registrar.

Suspension or Dismissal

In cases of academic dishonesty where the faculty member wants to recommend suspension or dismissal, the faculty member shall consult with the appropriate associate dean or education director and shall recommend suspension or dismissal in writing to the appropriate college official within five working days (Monday through Friday, exclusive of holidays). The faculty member shall also inform the student in writing.

Academic Review

The individual records of students who are recommended by a faculty member for suspension or dismissal due to academic dishonesty will be reviewed by the Academic Standards Committee.

Students will be required to provide a statement or explanation of their situation as well as attend a meeting to review the circumstances surrounding the dishonest behavior. At that meeting, a decision will be made regarding whether the student will be suspended, be dismissed, or can continue at the college under specific conditions.

If the student fails to live up to these conditions, the student will be suspended for a minimum of one semester or dismissed from the college.

Recording

Suspensions or dismissal for academic dishonesty will be recorded on a student’s official transcript as a withdrawal.

Appeal

The decision of the Academic Standards Committee is final; there is no appeal.

Statement of Academic Freedom

Faculty members shall be free to teach course information without regard to censorship or any other artificial restraints on free inquiry and learning. Faculty members shall be restricted to dealing with course materials in the classroom environment and shall not use the classroom as a basis for the transmission of information outside of their assigned courses. They shall, however, be free to discuss any controversial issues dealing with their courses without the fear of reprisal, provided the discussions are related to subjects taught.

The CIA has developed standard course materials that faculty members are expected to teach. Faculty members are encouraged to present individual views and alternative materials as a means of supplementing, but not replacing, that standard course material.

Academic freedom in the CIA shall not be deemed to permit or condone denigration or demeaning criticisms of other faculty members, staff members, students, the CIA, its programs, or the foodservice and hospitality industry.

Freedom of individual conscience, association, and expression shall be encouraged and fairness of procedure shall be observed both to safeguard legitimate interests of the CIA and to exhibit by appropriate example the basic objectives of a democratic society.

Supervised Alcohol Tasting

With three exceptions, public consumption of alcoholic beverages in CIA-owned and -operated facilities and properties is strictly prohibited. The exceptions are as follows: when consumption is part of the course within the classroom, during specifically approved college functions, and in the CIA’s public restaurants and cafés. The legal drinking age in New York, California, and Texas is 21, and laws governing the sale and service of alcoholic beverages are observed at all CIA campus locations.

The possession, solicitation, sale, and/or use of illegal drugs are unconditionally prohibited. Violations will result in suspension and possible dismissal from the college.

At the CIA Singapore, rules and regulations pertaining to this section will be enforced under Singaporean law.

Transfers Between Campuses

In some instances, a currently enrolled associate degree student may seek a transfer of studies to a different CIA campus in the U.S. The following procedure has been established so that each case may be considered on an individual basis.

The student must submit a written request for transfer to the appropriate department at the target campus that includes a full explanation as to why the transfer is necessary. For transfers to the California campus, the student should contact the assistant director of student affairs; for transfers to New York, Student Financial and Registration Services; and for transfers to Texas, the director of education. As part of this written request, the student will provide a personal plan identifying dates for the transfer request and how he or she intends to maintain their academic progress through the process.

The written request will be reviewed and given consideration based on the following conditions:

  • Space is available at the target campus,
  • The student has completed at least one semester of study, and at least one semester of study remains prior to anticipated graduation,
  • The student must have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0,
  • The student’s learning track will not be interrupted in a way that will interfere with his or her academic progress,
  • The student will be responsible for any makeup and re-registration fees,
  • The student does not have any unresolved probationary or disciplinary issues, and
  • The student is in good financial standing. 

A student is allowed only one transfer opportunity during his or her degree pursuit. The student may not retake any class in which he or she has previously received a final grade according to Repeating a Course. Attendance records will carry over from one campus to the other and will be considered along with academic progress.

A student who has withdrawn or who is on a leave of absence may also be considered for transfer to another campus if the request is made within one year of the original leave.

Once all criteria are reviewed, the student will be notified of the transfer decision by the assistant director of student affairs at the California campus, Student Financial and Registration Services in New York, or the director of education in Texas.

Professionalism/Class Participation—WBGC

Graduate certificate-level coursework requires a significant amount of commitment from enrolled students (and the instructors). The expectations of a traditional graduate course require students to spend three hours in class each week and, depending on work habits and the demands of the course, another nine–12 hours per week on readings and assignments. The assignments and expectations for each course are very rigorous and intense. While students will receive a great deal of instruction and guidance in completing the coursework, it is up to the student to make the most out of the overall experience. In class, students will engage in consistently high levels of writing, communicating, and group work in order to achieve the course learning objectives. Students will be expected to have thoroughly and critically read all course materials in order to best benefit from the lectures, tours, and tastings, and all students are required to actively participate in the discussion.

Classes are a community of learners, which means students will depend upon each other to support and inform one another. Please refrain from behaviors that would be inappropriate for a learning environment. Electronic devices are permitted in class, and students are encouraged to use them as a resource during discussions and debates; however, please refrain from using electronics during lecture, presentations, or quizzes. Students are encouraged to ask questions, raise issues to the class, and/or make suggestions related to the topics studied. It is advisable to respect each other’s opinions and refrain from frequent interruptions of the lecturer or colleagues. Students are expected to:

  • Display a willingness to listen to, help, and support other students.
  • Take notes on lecture material and demonstrations.
  • Contribute to the daily lecture and discussion.
  • Refer to material from reading assignments.
  • Be attentive to guest speakers and ask relevant questions.
  • Actively participate in class activities and field trips.
  • Work effectively and cooperatively in group activities or projects.
  • Demonstrate an understanding and respect for alcoholic beverages.
  • Exhibit respect for teachers, visitors, and colleagues.
  • Stay open-minded to the opinions of others.

Readmission Policy

For the full policy on readmission to The Culinary Institute of America, please see the Readmission Policy .

Externship

Students in the associate degree programs (and, in some cases, the bachelor’s program in Singapore) will be required to devote a semester to furthering their skills in an extern position in the foodservice industry. Externship, which takes place in the third semester of the associate degree programs, is a full-time commitment of a minimum of 15 weeks or 600 hours of full-time work at a CIA-approved location. A satisfactory evaluation of the experience is required for students to receive their degree.

The externship program is administered under the auspices of the Center for Career and Academic Advising  at the Hyde Park, NY campus.  

Externship information in this section also applies to the CIA Singapore, with the following distinctions. Students who enter the bachelor’s program in Singapore from a non-relevant diploma program must complete the CIA Externship course following the completion of the final semester of academic classes (“top-up” module semester). Students who have entered the CIA Singapore with a relevant diploma  must participate in a non-graded professional bridge semester. Training agreements for both the externship and professional bridge must be returned to the managing director no later than the third week of the final semester of course work. CIA Singapore students who do not have additional courses to complete must submit the Professional Bridge Training Agreement prior to the 10th week of the fourth semester.

Externship Planning

Externship is considered a requirement and all students must attend externship career planning sessions scheduled during the first and second semesters. Students who miss any of these sessions will be issued an absence for that session. This absence will be recorded on their transcripts with the externship grade.

Students should begin exploring externship possibilities well in advance to make sure they have secured a position and submitted a training agreement at the end of the second semester. They must select an externship site from an established list of approved sites. A student may not complete his or her externship at a site owned by a member of that student’s family. It is the student’s responsibility to initiate contact with these employers and obtain a position as an extern. The Center for Career and Academic Advising staff will assist as needed. Externship candidates in the U.S. who have not provided this office with a signed training agreement from an approved externship site within the first three weeks of the semester prior to the start of the externship will be officially withdrawn. (See Withdrawals.)

Prerequisites for Externship

Students may be registered for Externship with one culinary arts or baking and pastry arts laboratory course outstanding and one liberal arts or business management course outstanding. An outstanding course is defined as one the student has failed, has received an Incomplete, or from which he or she has withdrawn. However—without exception—to begin externship, students must have received a passing grade for:

Students who fail their practical examination(s) will be notified immediately by the faculty member administering the examination and the Registrar’s Office. Students must make arrangements with Student Financial and Registration Services to retake the exam by the end of the semester. They must pass these exams to begin their externship. The Registrar’s Office will notify students of any outstanding courses.

Acceptance of an Externship

Once a student has communicated acceptance of an externship verbally or in writing to the employer, this is viewed as a binding commitment on the student’s part to complete the experience. Failure to follow through with the agreement may result in a grade of “F.”

An “F” grade will not be assigned if:

  • A viable reason is presented in writing to the Center for Career and Academic Advising staff and property chef for not completing the externship—personal or family illness, or other circumstances beyond the student’s control.
  • The student informs his or her supervisor at the externship site of the change in plans, and obtains a letter from the supervisor that indicates acceptance of the student’s decision not to begin work at the site. A Center for Career and Academic Advising staff member will then contact the supervisor to verbally confirm that acceptance.

Externship Completion

To receive credit for the course of Externship, a student must be properly registered, which includes financial and academic clearance granted through SFRS and having submitted a signed training agreement to the Center for Career and Academic Advising indicating 15 weeks or 600 hours at an approved site. No credit will be given for any time worked prior to registration for the course.

To pass the course of Externship, students must achieve a passing evaluation from their externship supervisor, submit all externship assignments on time for grading, and receive a passing grade for these assignments.

Students will receive an “F” grade and may be required to repeat the externship if they:

  • Fail to complete a minimum of 15 weeks or 600 hours of full-time work at a CIA-approved site,
  • Work at an establishment that has not been approved for externship,
  • Fail to submit satisfactory work in the form of their externship manual and support materials, or
  • Are terminated from their externship or leave voluntarily. In addition to receiving an “F” grade, they will also be withdrawn from the CIA.

Any student who fails or withdraws while out on externship must complete a second externship before returning to campus for the first semester of the sophomore year. If a student returns for sophomore year first semester, submits his or her manual, and receives an “F” on the manual, then the student may complete that semester and repeat the course of Externship before advancing to the second semester of the sophomore year.

Students must make arrangements with the Center for Career and Academic Advising and Student Financial and Registration Services if they need to make up a failed externship. The fee to make up the externship is $150.

For completion of a second externship, students must complete a minimum of 15 weeks or 600 hours of full-time work at an approved CIA externship site. Students completing a second externship are required to choose a different approved externship location than where they went the first time. Successfully completing a second externship is a prerequisite for the second semester of the sophomore year. There is no grade period for the makeup of a second externship.

Returning from Externship

The Culinary Institute of America requires all students to return on their scheduled return date from externship. If you do not, you will be withdrawn. If the college grants a student permission to return on a different date, that selected date will be based on availability. Regardless of a student’s return date, the externship manual is due on the date that was assigned at the point of registration for the course. Failure to submit the manual on the assigned due date will result in five points per day deduction, which could result in failure.

Extending the length of the externship period beyond the scheduled return date for the student’s group may jeopardize the student’s financial aid status and may adversely affect other aspects of his or her status in the fourth semester.

International Students

Per U.S. Department of Homeland Security regulations, international students with an F-1 visa must complete one full academic year (two semesters) in order to be eligible to enter the course of Externship. The Registrar’s Office will verify that this requirement has been met. International students will need to provide a copy of their completed Training Agreement to their designated school official (DSO) at their campus location to have their I-20 form authorized, and then obtain a Social Security card from a local Social Security Office.

International students seeking to complete their externship outside the United States should be aware that being outside the U.S. for more than five months will require a new visa application.

International students are encouraged to direct any questions regarding their F-1 visa status and their externship to the designated school official at their campus location.

Web-Based Learning

The college employs Moodle as its web-based course management system. Using a secure password, the CIA Moodle environment can be easily accessed by students and faculty both on and off campus using a wide range of web-enabled devices. The use of Moodle as a web-based learning tool provides on-demand, online access to all posted course guides, recipe manuals, syllabi, assessment rubrics, lecture notes, presentations, course documents, and other curricular support materials. Students can read and study the course material directly online and/or download, save and/or print all or selected portions of these materials.

The system also gives students the ability to use the web to access other pertinent resources, including various online learning tools, external websites, and a wide assortment of educational media. In addition, the use of Moodle ensures that faculty and students are able to take advantage of a number of enhanced features, including discussion forums, interactive glossaries, wiki spaces, tools for digital storytelling, and assorted multimedia projects, to name just a few.

The Moodle course management system is just one of many online applications available to enrich our students’ educational experience. For information on other web-based resources and capabilities, please see Technology on Campus for Students .

CIA-Cornell Collaborative Degree Program

The Culinary Institute of America and the Cornell School of Hotel Administration, recognized as the leading educational innovators in service and hospitality management, have formed an alliance to offer a collaborative degree program for students with a passion for the culinary arts and hospitality operations. After earning their AOS or AAS at the CIA, students can transfer to Cornell and complete their Bachelor of Science (BS) from the Cornell School of Hotel Administration in four to five semesters. This unique opportunity allows CIA students to explore topics such as advanced restaurant management, revenue management, design and development, and restaurant entrepreneurship, as well as foodservice in hotels, resorts, spas, stadiums, institutions, and other settings.

Students may be accepted into the program after completing their associate degree program at the CIA. They must complete the Cornell transfer application requirements and interview with the Cornell School of Hotel Administration for consideration. In a predefined program, students pursuing an AOS or AAS in culinary arts or baking and pastry arts may be awarded up to 50 transfer credits.

To learn more, visit www.shacia.org or www.hotelschool.cornell.edu, or e-mail ha-cia_alliance@cornell.edu.

Privacy of Application Records

In accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, the CIA does not release confidential academic and personal information, except under conditions permitted by law, without a student’s written permission.

Applicants to the CIA who are not yet enrolled and in attendance may not waive the confidentiality of their records. This means applicants may not inspect, review, or photocopy any material submitted to the college for consideration, including letters of reference, official transcripts, employment evaluations, and interview and test results, until after they are accepted and enrolled at the CIA. At that time, students will have access to the material in the permanent file in accordance with stated policy, copies of which are available in the Registrar’s Office.

The CIA does not return any materials sent as part of the admission review process. Applicants should not submit original diplomas and certificates, as they will not be returned.

Privacy of Education Records

U.S. Campuses

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (“FERPA”) is a U.S. federal law that protects the privacy of student education records and gives students who reach the age of 18 or attend a postsecondary institution the right to inspect and review their own education records.

FERPA grants students at the U.S. campuses the following rights with respect to education records:

  1. The right to inspect and review his or her education records. A student may inspect and review his or her education records after submitting a written request to the school official responsible for the record. The school official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the education records may be inspected within 45 days of receiving such written request.
  1. The right to request an amendment of his or her education records that he or she may believe are inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of his or her privacy. A student may ask a school official to amend a record that he or she believes is inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of his or her privacy. The student must provide the appropriate school official with a written statement clearly identifying the part of the education record he or she would like changed, and specify why it is inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of his or her privacy. The school official who receives the request for amendment must decide within a reasonable period whether corrective action consistent with the student’s request will be taken. The CIA may either amend the education record or decide not to amend the education record. If the school decides not to amend the education record, the appropriate school official will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of the right to a hearing to challenge the information.
  1. The right to consent to disclosure of personally identifiable information contained in his or her education records. The CIA does not release information from a student’s education records without the student’s written consent unless such disclosure is permitted under FERPA as discussed fully in The Culinary Institute of America’s FERPA Policy.

    One of the permitted exceptions to the consent to disclosure requirement is to a CIA school official with a legitimate educational interest.

    A school official is a person in an administrative, a supervisory, an academic, or a support staff position, or a law enforcement official employed by the CIA; a trustee; a person or company under contract to or acting as an agent for the CIA to provide a service instead of using CIA employees or officials, such as an attorney, an auditor, a consultant or a collection agent; or a student serving on an official committee or assisting a school official in performing his or her task. A school official is deemed to have a legitimate educational interest when the information requested is necessary for that school official to (a) perform appropriate tasks that are specified in his or her position description or by a contract agreement; (b) perform a task related to the student’s education; (c) perform a task related to the discipline of the student; or (d) provide a service or benefit relating to the student or the student’s family such as health care, counseling, job placement, or financial aid.
  1. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the CIA to comply with the requirements of FERPA.

    The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is:

    Family Policy Compliance Office
    U.S. Department of Education
    600 Independence Avenue SW
    Washington, DC 20202-4605

    Please note: In accordance with FERPA, the CIA may disclose at its discretion the following directory information without the student’s consent: name, permanent address, campus box number, dates of attendance, degrees and/or certificates received with date, campus e-mail address, photographs, academic program, awards or honors, or enrollment status. A student may opt out of disclosure of directory information by completing the Request to Prevent Disclosure of Directory Information in the Student Financial and Registration Services Office or on the student portal within two weeks of their start date at the CIA.

    All questions in reference to FERPA should be directed to the registrar.

Singapore Campus

The CIA Singapore protects the privacy of student education records and gives students who reach the age 18 or attend a postsecondary institution the right to inspect and review their own education records.

Please note that the college’s contract with the Singapore Institute of Technology, our partner university, requires that the CIA provide student transcripts to SIT for Singapore Ministry of Education records.

Students are required to sign on the Student Undertaking Form that they consent to the storage and transmission of their personal information by SIT and the CIA Singapore internally within SIT and the CIA Singapore and mutually between SIT and the CIA Singapore for the purpose of the delivery of the degree program. SIT seeks the student’s consent before disseminating his or her information to an outside party (e.g., a sponsoring company).

Retention of Student Records

The Culinary Institute of America permanently maintains data for our enrolled students in both paper and electronic form. Data for withdrawn and graduated students is archived electronically.

Paper documents are kept in locked, fireproof file cabinets at each campus. Electronic documents are stored within our student information system as well as our document management system and are backed up via Symantec BackupExec nightly to disk and weekly to tape (stored in fireproof safe). For added security, duplicate copies are kept in off-site storage facilities within fireproof cabinets. Academic records are accessible by the registrar and his/her designees only.